Why waste recycling is worth it in NSW

Waste recycling is growing in NSW, but the cost of doing so is rising as the state continues to grapple with a water crisis.

The cost of collecting, sorting, and disposing of waste has risen steadily in recent years as the amount of waste diverted from household and business landfills has exploded.

A new report from waste recycling firm WasteDirect shows that waste recycling in NSW has increased by over 50 per cent over the past 10 years.

Its founder, Mark Harris, says he’s been trying to make the most of this growth in order to reduce the amount waste being dumped on our landfares.

“The problem with waste is that it’s in the environment and it’s not going to be cleaned up,” Mr Harris said.

“[It’s] a really easy way to get around the environmental costs of our industry, to put our land in waste and then to keep getting the product for ourselves.”

“If you can recycle, that’s the best way to do it.”

The company has a network of stores in NSW and Victoria that have been set up to give customers a simple way to recycle waste, such as bags, bottles, and cans.

WasteDirect’s NSW store is open 7am-9pm daily, and its Victoria store is opening on Friday.

While many retailers around the country have seen an increase in waste recycling over the last year, the company has been targeting the Sydney market with its latest program.

We’re here to help make sure your household and businesses are using the right technology to recycle and move their waste safely, said WasteDirect chief executive John Huggins.

He says NSW is the first state in the country to be fully committed to waste recycling.

But the report warns that NSW’s recycling infrastructure will need to be upgraded before the system can be considered a viable alternative to other states.

Mr Harris says NSW needs to invest in waste management, which he says is a growing trend across the country.

It would also help the citys recycling system to attract more residents to come and buy recycling, which is also seen as a way to reduce environmental impacts.

As well as the NSW program, Mr Harris says WasteDirect will be opening a waste recycling facility in Melbourne, and the company is planning to expand its operations in the city of Adelaide.

Topics:business-economics-and-finance,environment,environmental-management,sweden,australia